Posts Tagged ‘activities’

Border Trim Pumpkin Lantern Tutorial

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Border Trim Pumpkin Lanterns - Teacher Created Resources

Have you started thinking about Halloween decorations for the classroom yet?  If you have leftover border trim around, this easy hanging pumpkin lantern is a great way to transition your classroom into October.

Materials:
(3) 36” Orange Border Trim
(1) Green Border Trim
Ribbon
Scissors
Stapler
Glue

Pumpkin Lantern Tutorial - Teacher Created Resources 

Instructions:
1) Cut your orange border trim into the following strips:
-13 inches (x2)
-11 inches (x2)
-9 inches (x2)
-8 inches (x1)

2) Stack the border strips altogether. The 8” strip would be in the center and then sandwich them from shortest strip to longest strip. Push the stack of strips down to make the pumpkin shape and staple. Push the bottom strip up and staple.

3) Draw or trace two leaves using green border trim and secure to the top of the pumpkin with glue.

4) Attach a piece of ribbon (brown burlap ribbon looks great) and hang a bunch of pumpkins lanterns from the ceiling.

These border trim pumpkin lanterns are also a great craft for students. Each student can make their own pumpkin lantern so you can use them to hang them above their desk or students can take them home to their parents. For more Halloween classroom crafts see our Halloween Classroom Ideas Board on Pinterest.

4th of July Fun Facts & Free Activity

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

4th of July Fun Facts and Free Activity

4th of July is all about patriotism and fireworks. Share these fun historical facts about the history of 4th of July with your kids, then try some of the suggested activities to celebrate.

4th of July Fun Facts 

  • Independence Day is celebrated every year in the United States on the Fourth of July.
  • The liberty bell weighs 2080 pounds and its circumference is 12 feet.
  • The Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson.
  • On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence that gave freedom to all who lived in the United States.
  • The Declaration of Independence was first read to the public in Philadelphia, where it was celebrated with bells that rang all night long.
  • Twelve of the thirteen original colonies approved the final draft of the Declaration of the Independence.
  • The first Independence Day celebration took place on July 4, 1777.
  • On the 4th of July, we celebrate the birthday of the United States.
  • People celebrate the 4th of July by going to picnics, parades and firework shows.
  • In 1941, Congress declared the 4th of July a federal holiday.
4th of July Printable Decorations from Big & Easy Patterns & Celebrate the Holidays

4th of July Printable Decorations from Big & Easy Patterns & Celebrate the Holidays

4th of July Fun Activity Suggestions

  • Create and color your own U.S.A. flag and 4th of July pictures. Use them as decorations for a 4th of July party.
  • Create a mural of a 4th of July parade using paint and a roll of paper across the wall.
  • Discuss the Declaration of Independence and have the students write about the importance of freedom.
  • Compose an acrostic poem with the word “independence”.
  • Do patriotic brain teasers and word scrambles. Download free USA Brain Teasers here.

 

*Facts from the following books: Patriotic Songs & Symbols, Celebrate the Holidays & Multicultural Holidays

Math Manipulative Games

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Math Manipulative Games - Teacher Created Resources

Many teachers know that manipulatives are helpful for teaching math to kids, especially younger kids. Using physical objects is a hands-on approach to learning math that helps kids develop math concepts. Pairing number spinners with counters is a great way to teach math by allowing kids to problem solve and count. Here are some great math games to play using math manipulatives and number spinners.

Addition & Subtraction Manipulative Games for Pre-K, Kindergarten & 1st Grade

Number Spinners & Counters - Teacher Created Resources

Practice basic addition and subtraction facts by having students spin a number spinner, this will be the first value. Then have the students spin again on another number spinner, this is the second value.  Have the students subtract the second number from the first. Have the students state their answers and show them using counters.

Here’s another game you can play using number spinners:

Number Sense and Place Value Game for  2nd – 3rd Grade

Have students practice spinning any of the number spinners and then call out the number they land on. Students can write the number down in word form, to practice the correlation between the word and the numeral representation.

Have students practice this with larger numbers, asking them to spin twice or even three times to make two-and-three-digit numbers. For example, if a student spins three times, and first spins a 3, then a 6, then a 9, he or she should write down the number 369.

Then have them write “three hundred sixty-nine” next to the numerals. Have students practice comparing different numbers they spin. If they first spin the above number (369), then an 8, a 2, and a 1, student should write: 369<821.

4 Tips on Encouraging Healthy Habits for Kids

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Healthy Habits Pledge_Teacher Created Resources

Incorporating fun physical outdoor games and indoor classroom exercises are great ways for teachers to encourage students to establish healthy habits. The National Health Education Standards & Common Core State Standards aim to support a whole-child approach to education-one that that ensures that each student is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged in their learning. Here are a few tips for establishing healthy habits in the classroom.

 

  1. Share the Healthy Habits Pledge above with students and discuss each line. Challenge students to learn the pledge and share it with family members. The goal here is to inspire the whole family to focus on good nutrition and support healthy habits. Post the pledge in the classroom and review it from time to time as students gain more insights into personal health.
  2. Introduce daily exercise to your students. Use physical activities to start the day and/or to transition from one activity to another. Throw in an extra exercise on tough days, or use more than one when weather conditions inhibit outdoor activity. These short, physical exercise breaks are a positive way to settle students for their day’s work.  And don’t forget breathing exercises! They can be done at any time of day and can help refocus or calm students as needed.
  3. Gather and display reference materials for the classroom on topics of nutrition, fitness, and overall health. Resources might include library or trade books, magazines, posters, and kid-friendly materials printed from government websites.  If appropriate, save links to relevant websites in a dedicated folder on classroom computers.
  4. Encourage students to start collecting packaging and nutritional labels from food products. Explain that they will be learning to read them and using them for comparisons. Establish an area in the classroom where these can be stores or displayed.

For free sample pages, classroom exercises, and ideas see Healthy Habits for Healthy Kids.