Archive for the ‘Teacher Resources’ Category

Math Manipulative Games

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Math Manipulative Games - Teacher Created Resources

Many teachers know that manipulatives are helpful for teaching math to kids, especially younger kids. Using physical objects is a hands-on approach to learning math that helps kids develop math concepts. Pairing number spinners with counters is a great way to teach math by allowing kids to problem solve and count. Here are some great math games to play using math manipulatives and number spinners.

Addition & Subtraction Manipulative Games for Pre-K, Kindergarten & 1st Grade

Number Spinners & Counters - Teacher Created Resources

Practice basic addition and subtraction facts by having students spin a number spinner, this will be the first value. Then have the students spin again on another number spinner, this is the second value.  Have the students subtract the second number from the first. Have the students state their answers and show them using counters.

Here’s another game you can play using number spinners:

Number Sense and Place Value Game for  2nd – 3rd Grade

Have students practice spinning any of the number spinners and then call out the number they land on. Students can write the number down in word form, to practice the correlation between the word and the numeral representation.

Have students practice this with larger numbers, asking them to spin twice or even three times to make two-and-three-digit numbers. For example, if a student spins three times, and first spins a 3, then a 6, then a 9, he or she should write down the number 369.

Then have them write “three hundred sixty-nine” next to the numerals. Have students practice comparing different numbers they spin. If they first spin the above number (369), then an 8, a 2, and a 1, student should write: 369<821.

Bulletin Board: Exploring the A,B, Seas!

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

 A B Seas - Teacher Created Resources

This bulletin board is a great way to showcase students’ ocean explorations. The patterns and instruction can be found in the Sea Animals Thematic Unit.

  1. Start by using blue paper to create a watery backdrop.  There are many paper shades and textures to choose from. Large blue plastic tablecloths work well, too!
  2. Next, paint the sea floor beige or light brown.  If you mix white glue into your paint students can sprinkle sand on the paint as it dries to create a more realistic look.
  3. Add green tissue paper seaweed or paint some right on the water!
  4. Add your sea birds, mammals, crustaceans, and fish projects as they are completed.
  5. Add Aqua Mini Polka dots Scalloped Border Trim

Here are some ideas to start filling your ocean.  You can have each student work on one sea creature, or slowly add them yourself.

Seagull:  Fold and unfold a small paper plate to create a line dividing the plate in half.  Paint the back of the whole plate grey. (When folded over, the gray will form the gulls’ wings.)  Draw two lines on the front of the plate (from the rim to the crease) to suggest the head and neck of the gull.  Cut on the lines for the head and the neck and then bend the remaining “wings” down.  Cut out yellow or orange legs and use markers to add eyes and beak.

Shark:  Paint a small plate gray and cut and add grey fins.  Cut out a white mouth and eyes and use a black marker to draw teeth and add pupils to the eyes.

Jellyfish:  Use pink or blue paper or painted halves of paper plates for the jellyfish bodies.  For the tentacles, add crepe paper streamers using tape, glue, or staples.

Crab:  Cut shiny red plates in half.  To make eye stems, tape red chenille strips to the flat side of the plate.  Glue eyes to the stems.  Add legs and pinchers to each crab.

Fish:  Cut out five-inch hearts for the fish bodies, one-inch hearts for the fish mouths, and two-inch hearts for the fins.  Add eyes and glitter for sparkly fish scales.  Blue glitter-paint makes great fish bubbles, too.

Divers:  Create divers wearing bathing suits.  Cut out diving masks and add smaller blue ovals on the masks.  Glue eyes to the blue ovals and glue black rectangles to the masks to represent snorkels. Add flippers and the divers are ready to go!

 

Bulletin Board Idea: Aloha to a Great Year

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Aloha Bulletin Board Teacher Created Resources

Summer is right around the corner! Here’s a fun idea for a bulletin board. Mix your spring and summer accents to create a bright end-of-the-year Hawaiian style bulletin board. Use yellow paper for the background (or any other brightly colored paper). Layer the sides with Fun Flowers Straight Border Trim, Green Scalloped Border Trim, and Hot Pink Polka Dots Scalloped Border Trim. To create the Aloha banner, grab a thin piece of ribbon and string it along the pre-cut holes of the Sassy Solid Pennants. Use Multi Bright Sassy Solids 3″ Letters to spell out “Aloha” on the pennants. Add four pieces from the Sassy Dot Hearts Create & Decorate  Set in the middle of the board, and use the rest of the Sassy Solids Letters to spell out “to a Great Year!”. Finish off with Fun Flower Accents  & Surfboards Accents. To personalize the bulletin board more, have each student pick their own surfboard to put on the bulletin board. They can write their names and add stickers to make the surfboard completely their own.

8 Test-Taking Tips for Multiple-Choice Questions

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Test Taking Tips Teacher Created Resources

Some multiple-choice questions are straightforward and easy. Some questions, however, stump even the most prepared student. In cases like that, students have to make an educated guess. An educated guess is a guess that uses what students know to help guide their attempt. Students select a particular answer because they’ve thought about the format of the question, the word choice, the other possible answers, and the language of what’s being asked. By making an educated guess, students increase their chance of guessing correctly. Share these test-taking tips with students before their next multiple-choice test:

  1. Read the directions. It’s crucial. You may assume you know what is being asked, but sometimes directions can be tricky when you least expect them to be.
  2. Read the questions before you read the passage. Doing this allows you to read the text through a more educated and focused lens. For example, if you know that you will be asked to identify the main idea, you can be on the lookout for that head of time.
  3. Don’t skip a question. Instead, try to make an educated guess. That starts with crossing off the ones you definitely know are not the correct answer. For instance, if you have four possible answers (A, B, C, D) and you can cross off two of them immediately, you’ve doubled your chances of guessing correctly. If you don’t cross off any obvious ones, you would only have a 25% chance of guessing right. However, if you cross off two, you now have a 50% chance.
  4. Read carefully for words like always, never, not, except, and every. Words like these are there to make you stumble. They make the question very specific. Sometimes the answers can be right some of the time, but if a word like always or every is in the question, the answer must be right all of the time.
  5. After reading a question, try to come up with the answer first in your head before looking at the possible answers. That way, you will be less likely to bubble or click something you aren’t sure about.
  6. In questions with an “All of the above” answer, think of it this way: if you can identify at least two that are correct, then “All of the above” is probably the correct answer.
  7. In questions with a “None of the above” answer, this of it this way: if you can identify at least two that are not correct, then “None of the above” is probably the correct answer.
  8. Don’t keep changing your answer. Unless you are sure you made a mistake, usually the first answer you chose is the right one.

Find more tips and practice passages in Nonfiction Reading Comprehension for the Common Core