Calendar Computation

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Mathematics, Measurement (includes Time), Problem Solving

Grade 5- 8

Objective

Students use a calendar to solve math problems.

Directions

Show students a calendar in the classroom or the calendar shown below. Tell them that this is a typical calendar for one month:
Sun. Mon. Tue. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat.
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31

There are always seven days in a week. A week will often continue on to the next month. Any day of the week--such as a Sunday--is always seven days after the previous Sunday and seven days before the next Sunday.
These months have 30 days:
April June September November

These months have 31 days:
January March May July August October December

(Note: February has 28 days except leap year when it has 29 days.)
Years
Look at the following information about years:
1 year = 12 months 1 year = 365 days 100 years = 1 century
1 year = 52 weeks 10 years = 1 decade 1,000 years = 1 millennium

Leap Years
  • Leap years are scheduled every four years on years ending with a multiple of 4. Leap years usually coincide with presidential election years in the United States.
  • A leap year has 366 days. Leap years are not scheduled for the first year of a century unless the year is divisible by 400. The year 2000 is evenly divisible by 400 and thus is a leap year. The year 1900 is not evenly divisible by 400 and thus was not a leap year.

Recent and Future Leap Years
1992 1996 2000 2004 2008

Have them use the calendar to solve the problems on the activity sheet.

Resources

  • Calendar Computation activity sheets
  • pencils

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