Archive for the ‘Classroom Management’ Category

Writing Effective Report Card Comments on Behavior

Friday, February 14th, 2014

Writing Effective Report Card Comments on Behavior

When it comes to writing report card comments and progress reports, it can be challenging to find effective words to communicate the details of each student’s progress. When writing report card comments, remember to focus on the positive first. Comments on both academic and personal behaviors should be assessed and written in a report card so that students and parents can see their strengths and areas of improvement in order to create a progressive, effective outcome. We have included some thoughtful, constructive, and easily-customizable report card comments designed to address behavior issues and strengthen parent-teacher communication and improve student behavior.

Proficient

  • ______ is a good citizen. He/she is dependable, responsible,
    and respectful.
  • ______ shares and listens. He/she works well with others.
  • _______is a pleasant, respectful, and well-behaved student.
  • Making Progress

  • Since our last conference, _______’s behavior has been improving.
    He/she is showing interest in his/her schoolwork and seems eager to learn.
  • _______ is showing increased desire to demonstrate appropriate attitude and acceptable behavior in the classroom.
  • _______ is learning to anticipate the consequences of his/her actions. This is improving his/her behavior because he/she is taking time to think before acting.
  • There has been noticeable improvement in _______’s behavior. He/she has made an effort to cooperate with his/her peers and practice self-control. Thank you for your support.
  • Lately, _______ has been working to correct his/her behavior, and I am very proud of him/her. I hope he/she continues to maintain improvement.
  • Needs Improvement

  • _______ can be very aggressive towards his classmates. Perhaps we should have him/her meet with the school counselor.
  • Please encourage _______ to use socially appropriate language at all time.
  • Socializing seems to be more important to ­_______ than classwork. He/she has great potential, but will not realize it until he/she pays better attention in class and focuses more in his/her work.
  • _______can be disruptive and disorderly. Please encourage him/her to be more responsible in his/her behavior, and call me to schedule a conference.
  • The above comments open the door to communication between the teacher and parents. It demonstrates reporting behavior progress in a clear, concise, and constructive manner. A teacher’s well written report card comments will be effective and can have the power to encourage and impact students and their parents positively.

    For more tips on report card comments in all subjects see, Writing Effective Report Card Comments.

    Making Assessments Meaningful for Students

    Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

    Making Assessments Meaningful for Students

    I think meaningful assessments can come in many shapes and sizes.  However, to be thoroughly engaging and to draw the best work out of the students, assessments should be aligned with real-world skills.

    When I think about my own definition of a “Meaningful Assessment,” I think the test must meet certain requirements.  The assessment must have value other than “because it’s on the test.”  It must have value to the individual student who is taking it, should incorporate skills that students need for their future, and it must assess skills other than the mere content. It must also test how the students communicate their content.

     

    CRITERIA FOR A MEANINGFUL CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT

    To address these requirements, I ask myself the following guided questions:

    1. Does the assessment involve Project-Based Learning?
    2. Does it allow for student choice of topics?
    3. Is it inquiry based?
    4. Does it ask that students to use some level of Internet literacy to find their answers?
    5. Does it involve independent problem solving?
    6. Does it incorporate the 4Cs?
    7. Do the students need to communicate their knowledge via writing in some way?
    8. Does the final draft or project require other modalities in its presentation? (visual, oral, data, etc…)

    Clearly not all assessments achieve every single characteristic listed above.  But in our attempt to address some of these elements, we will have made our classroom assessments so much more meaningful.

    So how can high-stakes assessments be meaningful to students?  For one thing, high-stakes tests shouldn’t be so high-stakes.  It’s inauthentic.  They should and still can be a mere snapshot of ability.  Additionally, those occasional assessments need to take a back seat to the real learning and achievement going on in every day assessments observed by the teacher.

    The key here, however, is to assess everyday.  Not in boring, multiple-choice daily quizzes, but in informal, engaging assessments that take more than just a snapshot of a student’s knowledge at one moment in time.

    When assessing the value of your own assessments, remember the 4 Cs and ask…do they allow for:

    Creativity – Are they students creating or just regurgitating?  Are they being given credit for presenting something other than what was described?

    Collaboration – Have they spent some time working with others to formulate their thoughts, brainstorm, or seek feedback from peers?

    Critical Thinking – Are the students doing more work than the teacher in seeking out information and problem solving?

    Communication – Does the assessment emphasize the need to communicate the content well?  Is there writing involved as well as other modalities?

     

    RUBRIC ON MEANINGFUL ASSESSMENTS

    So as an activity for myself, I created a rubric to look at whenever I was wondering if an assessment was going to be a waste of time or was going to connect with the students.  I thought I’d share it here:

    Meaningful Assessments

     

    Additionally, if you want to encourage students to really focus on the requirements on a rubric, add a row that’s only for them to fill out for you.  That way, the rubric’s feedback for you too.  Here’s an example of a quick rubric I designed that students could fill out. By also giving them a space to fill out, they own the rubric even more.  It’s one way the students and I can learn reciprocally.

    Meaningful Assessments

     

    So how do you ensure that your classroom assessments are meaningful?

     

     

    Heather Wolpert-Gawron is the author of the Project Based Writing series. This post is an excerpt from Heather’s new book, Writing Behind Every Door:  Teaching Common Core Writing Across the Content Areas (Routledge, 2014.)  You can follow Heather at her website:www.tweenteacher.com.

    Let’s Talk Centers

    Friday, February 1st, 2013

    Hello!  I’m super excited and honored to be a guest blogger for Teacher Created Resources!  My name is Staci and I am the author of a  blog called “Let’s Teach Something”.

    I teach Kindergarten and I do lots of centers in my classroom.  I do reading centers in the morning that focus mostly on our sight words and spelling words for the week.  I have literacy centers that focus on certain literature (both fiction and non-fiction) and phonics skills.  I also do learning centers in the afternoon.  These centers are a hodge-podge of skills that still need to be taught and/or reinforced in any subject area.  These learning centers include math, computers, puzzles, writing, sensory, art, listening, and surprise.  Surprise center is one of my favorites because I can make it anything to meet the curriculum needs.

    Today, I’m here to talk about how I organize my centers- more specifically my afternoon learning centers.  I have 8 centers, so I rotate the material every 8 school days- which could be intimidating, but is really very easy once you get started.  Here’s how I do it:

    Cereal Box Centers

    Cereal boxes.  Cereal boxes?!?!  You got it!  I put the materials for all 8 centers into a cereal box- then when it’s time for a certain theme, I grab the designated cereal box and it’s all right there!

    Here’s how it works:

    Learning Center Materials

     

    I have an index card listing all the centers- and the skill/activity the students will be doing at that center.

    In the above picture, you will notice that it’s “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie” theme.  So, here’s what the kids are doing:

    Learning Center Activities

    Listening:  Listen to a book on tape/CD.  Be sure to leave the CD and books in the cereal box.

    Writing:  Students always get a writing prompt.  At the beginning of the year, it’s simply copying the sentence I have written.  As they become more independent, I omit words for them to fill in such as “A tree is ______ and ______.”  Towards the end of the year, all they get is an open ended writing prompt that allows them to be as creative as they want in their writing such as “In the spring, I like to ________________.”  The writing prompt/example is the only thing that goes into the cereal box.

    Art:  Students do an arts/crafts project related to the theme.  Here they are making a mouse puppet.  Be sure to include all patterns, master copies, and a finished sample so the kids know what their end goal is to look like.  I do not include supplies, those are stored permanently at the art center itself, plus the cereal box isn’t big enough to hold all everything.

    Puzzles:  Students put together a puzzle or do a higher level thinking activity.  I do not include the puzzle in the cereal box.  I only list what puzzle it is, and I grab it from my puzzle bin when it comes time for that theme.

    Math:  If it’s an activity meant specifically for the center, it’s kept in the cereal box (like this math activity where they match the number on the cookie to the chocolate chips on another cookie).  If it’s a math activity I use a lot, it’s kept with my other math curriculum materials.

    Sensory:  This center is the easiest to plan and probably the students’ favorite.  I have a supply of sensory materials that I rotate through this center: sand, water, rice, tire shreds, plastic Easter eggs, jingle bells, Legos, water beads, etc.  I also have two dust pans to encourage responsibility and it allows the students to help in the clean-up!

    Computers:  I have two classroom computers as well as three iPads.  The students are given a computer program or an iPad app to do during their time at this center.

    Surprise:  This center is very flexible in that you can put anything you need your students to work on.  Sometimes it’s a holiday craft, other times it’s a skill that wasn’t mastered or just needs a little extra practice.

    “I’m finished with my center, what can I do?”
    I used to get this question a lot from my students.  Now, I have jobs that they can do when their center task is complete.
    Writing:  Students can draw/write with stencils.
    Art:  Students can color in a coloring book.
    Listening:  Students can use magnet letters to spell words found in the book.
    The rest of the centers are un-ending, meaning- they can rebuild the puzzle, keep playing in the sensory tub, or keep playing the computer game/app until center time is over.

    Centers are very beneficial for students because they teach the students the skill presented at that center as well as teaching the students how to work together.  If they come across a question or are unsure of something, they are first to ask their center partner before asking me.  It also gives me an opportunity to catch up on any work a student might be missing, do assessments with students, or reteach a concept that was not mastered in a small group.
    So, there you have it- my management and organizational tips for the centers in my classroom.  If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment.

    And don’t forget to visit my blog for other tips, tricks, and tidbits I use in my classroom.  Don’t forget to look for all the freebies I post!

    See you soon and thanks to Teacher Created Resources for having me!
    -Staci
    www.letsteachsomething.blogspot.com

     

    Staci Schutte, is a Kindergarten teacher and the author of a popular blog called Let’s Teach Something, where she shares tips, tricks, and tidbits that she uses in the classroom. She currently lives in Indiana with her husband, two sons and daughter and enjoys running, scrapbooking, and most recently shopping for pink things after having a baby girl a week ago.

     

    Classroom Management: The Hunt for a Toolbox

    Monday, September 10th, 2012

    When I first started teaching, how each day went depended a lot on how benevolent my students were feeling. It is embarrassing to admit that. It’s not as though I didn’t know a lot about classroom management; I just didn’t know how to make it work yet. The weeks went on and I learned every day, but I still had a few students who just had a lot of energy. You know, the ones who hate sitting down at all, who you check in with before class starts so when they need them, they will have that pencil and paper ready, rather than lurking at the bottom of their backpacks under missed assignments that are slowly being turned into pulp with the help of an old banana.

    Often these kids had really great attitudes, and most days I was able to keep everyone on task using my limited mental toolbox of classroom management strategies. But there were days, usually days when something different was happening, like rain or a modified bell schedule, when my class was straining at the seams, led by these special, energetic students. I could feel the moment when things started to go downhill, when productive energy got that wild note and I knew it was going to be a long day.

    Then one day, a student came into my classroom asking if I had the red toolbox.

    “What?” I asked in utter confusion.

    “The red toolbox. Mr. V said you might have it,” the kid answered helpfully.

    I knew I didn’t have any red toolbox, but since the kid was already there, I looked through any closet or drawer where a toolbox could be hiding. Had there been after-hours repairs on my classroom? Finally, I had to turn him away.

    “That’s okay, he said it might be Mrs. L who has it. He couldn’t remember.”

    Hmmm.

    At lunch, I got the scoop. The red toolbox is the trick that drains that little bit of extra energy while you get the rest of your class back on track. You simply write a hall pass for a student, before anything negative happens but after you see what direction things are heading, and your very energetic student rushes off to do you an important favor. Teachers in the know will look for the box, then suddenly remember that a certain teacher on the other side of the school might have borrowed it. This has to be done carefully, or students can spend forty-five minutes wandering around looking for the red toolbox. It is important to find out where students have already looked, and if you think they’ve been out of class for more than a few minutes, it might be time to say, “Sorry. I just can’t remember who has it. You’d better get back to class.”

    In this age of bell-to-bell teaching, I imagine this isn’t a popular strategy for everyone. The idea is that you keep the students exposed to content whether they’re able to participate meaningfully right then or not, right? I say, let them stretch their legs for five minutes and come back feeling good about themselves for helping and ready to learn.